What You Need to Know about Foodborne Illness

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Foodborne illness is a common – yet preventable – public health problem. Ensuring food safety is increasingly more important as food trends change along with the globalization of our food supply.

To prevent foodborne illness, it is necessary to understand how food becomes unsafe to eat and what proactive measures can be taken.

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Food Safety for Ground Beef Grilling

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Ready to start grilling hamburgers? Bacteria is of special concern with ground beef – because when beef is ground – more of the meat surface is exposed to potential harmful bacteria.

For this reason, ground beef must be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F, so as to kill all the bacteria and avoid foodborne illness.

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Grilling Food and Fire Safety

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Are you going to celebrate the weekend by throwing a grilling party? Make sure you have a plan that includes food safety and fire safety. Practicing proper food and fire safety principles and procedures are the keys to having a safe weekend full of fun, food, and family time!

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Sports Tailgating and Food Safety

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Because tailgate parties are an all-day food grilling and feast, there is an increased risk of foodborne illness.

Cooking outdoors presents a food safety challenge. Not not only does bacteria multiply faster in warmer temperatures, but preparing food outdoors makes safe food handling more challenging. Every good tailgate party starts with a good game plan – that should include food safety.

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Norovirus Dangers and Prevention

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Norovirus is a highly contagious virus and the most common viral foodborne illness. Norovirus infection is acquired by consuming produce (fruit and vegetables) irrigated with contaminated water contaminated with human or animal feces – or shellfish farmed or harvested in water contaminated with human sewage.

Because only a few norovirus particles can make people sick, infection can also occur by consuming food handled by a person infected with the virus – or being in direct contact with an object, surface, or person that has been infected.

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Food Safety When Eating Out

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Dinner and a movie date night? Ditch the leftovers, not your date!  Remember, leftovers are only safe for 2 hours at room temperature and won’t last through a movie – and only 1 hour if the temperature is over 90°F.

After that time, bacteria growth can occur and cause food illness. Likewise, during warmer months bacteria multiply faster – so keeping food safe is more challenging.

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Camping and Hiking Food Safety Tips

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Camping and hiking are great ways to exercise and appreciate nature. But they also create hunger – and food that is not packed properly and handled safely can create foodborne illness.

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Food Safety for Chicken

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Raw chicken and poultry may contain harmful bacteria and washing it does not remove the bacteria. This bacteria can also be spread to other items and food – if proper procedures are not followed. The only way to kill bacteria on chicken is by cooking it to a safe internal temperature – as measured by a food thermometer.

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Food Safety for Seafood

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The safe handling of seafood is essential to reducing the risk of foodborne illness. Follow basic food safety tips for buying, preparing, and storing fish and shellfish — so you and your family can safely enjoy the fine taste and good nutrition of seafood.

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Raw Oyster Dangers

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Raw shellfish (e.g. oysters, clams, mussels) can pose an increased risk to be contaminated – as they are filter feeders and become contaminated when their waters are polluted with raw sewage and bacteria.

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